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Inviting Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel to a point-counter-point discussion on Facebook.

Source: Inviting Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel to a point-counter-point discussion on Facebook.

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JoanMWheeler/DorisMSippel says… ‘Adoptees are the world’s experimental rats.’

I saw a blog post called, Stalking Irish Madness, Through Adoption’s Lens, written July 1, 2009

http://www.73adoptee.com/2009/07/stalking-irish-madness-through-adoptions-lens/

Joan/Doris says, in her comment, ‘Late to the game of responding to this post’.

She sure was, more like 4 months late, December 2009! The reason she was late, in responding, is because she was very busy adding MORE lies to her manuscript before publication. That would be the FIRST edition of Forbidden Family, which was published November 2009. It was then pulled by the publisher in May 2011 for her breach of contract; she lied to them about the ‘truth’ of the manuscript. Since then of course she has self-published it twice more! Certainly NOT a best seller! But getting back to the subject of THIS post…

First we shall see Joan/Doris’s comment, which contains her own misspellings, then a few thoughts from me, then a definition/discussion of epigenome, then the post and comments.

Joan M Wheeler says: December 22, 2009 at 11:52 AM

Late to the game of responding to this post, but, I, too, was fascinated by this author on NPR in July. As I listened to his description of schizophrenia, I couldn’t help but wonder of another type of genetic influence called eppingenome. I could be wrong on the spelling, but it is the environmental effects on the genes that cause subtle changes for the next generation. Therefore, subsequent generations as well.

This speaks to the issues of famine, alcoholism, stress of pregnacy on an already stressed female — and that stress could be lack of proper nutrician due to famine, and, the intensity of stress and worry under harsh conditions of poverty.

When considering the added stress of carrying a pregnancy to term of an unmarried,societal “scandleous” pregnancy and all the emotions forced upon a woman at that time leading to the birth of a “bastard”, then the effects of stress (eppigenome) on the mother and particularly the baby are magnified.

Makes me wonder what is truly genetic and what is environmental. Adoptees are the world’s experimental rats.  (end of her comment)

…Gert here…

As usual, her arguments; on the epigenome, are NOT in alignment with her CIRCUMSTANCE of being an adoptee. Her particular behaviors and mental instabilities are the PRODUCTS of her being raised with the ‘particular’ adoptive parents she had and NOT of any ‘stress’ gene produced BEFORE her birth! This is a typical way in which she manipulates things to fit her theory.

If any part of her argument is correct, than it FITS for her children, for they INHERITED her genetics alterations of their own genes and epigenomes!

This is also an example of how Joan/Doris uses ‘junk science’… anything out there that she can manipulate she will! She believes something and then goes out and finds anything that will FIT her belief. Then she proclaims to have the perfect statement of what it means to be an adoptee … ‘adoptees are the world’s experimental rats.’ JUNK SCIENCE and BULLSHIT. Even, if epigenomes alter genes that does NOT equate to her CONCLUSION that ‘adoptees are the world’s experimental rats’. That statement is a PERSONAL opinion and not BASED on SCIENTIFIC FACTS.

…SO WHAT IS the epigenome?

DNA modifications that do not change the DNA sequence can affect gene activity. Chemical compounds that are added to single genes can regulate their activity; these modifications are known as epigenetic changes. The epigenome comprises all of the chemical compounds that have been added to the entirety of one’s DNA (genome) as a way to regulate the activity (expression) of all the genes within the genome. The chemical compounds of the epigenome are not part of the DNA sequence, but are on or attached to DNA (“epi-“ means above in Greek). Epigenomic modifications remain as cells divide and in some cases can be inherited through the generations. Environmental influences, such as a person’s diet and exposure to pollutants, can also impact the epigenome.

Epigenetic changes can help determine whether genes are turned on or off and can influence the production of proteins in certain cells, ensuring that only necessary proteins are produced. For example, proteins that promote bone growth are not produced in muscle cells. Patterns of epigenome modification vary among individuals, different tissues within an individual, and even different cells.

A common type of epigenomic modification is called methylation. Methylation involves attaching small molecules called methyl groups, each consisting of one carbon atom and three hydrogen atoms, to segments of DNA. When methyl groups are added to a particular gene, that gene is turned off or silenced, and no protein is produced from that gene.

Because errors in the epigenetic process, such as modifying the wrong gene or failing to add a compound to a gene, can lead to abnormal gene activity or inactivity, they can cause genetic disorders. Conditions including cancers, metabolic disorders, and degenerative disorders have all been found to be related to epigenetic errors.

Scientists continue to explore the relationship between the genome and the chemical compounds that modify it. In particular, they are studying what effect the modifications have on gene function, protein production, and human health. (end of information)

…Gert here again…

So given that definition … Joan/Doris is wrong in her assertion and application of what epigenome is and can do.

In addition, the author of the post, in which Joan/Doris comments, states… ‘As a class, we adoptees are similarly tainted’.

Here is WHERE part of the real problematic aspects comes into play. Adoptees are NOT a class, as in ethnic background. No census form has ‘adoptee’ on list of ethnic background! There is NO ‘class’ of adoptee, as there is no class for LGBTI.

Everything these adoptees, who claim to be activists, write about, are from and ‘through adoption’s lens’ (quote from the author of this post). They and only they have the ‘right’ to speak about being adopted and what adoption means…so they insist.

Just because a person or group of people think something is wrong, with their ‘status’, doesn’t make them and their opinion correct. Adoption activists want to eliminate adoption; that will NEVER happen. They want their medical records and heritage information; very reasonable, but there are REAL AND CORRECT reasons WHY those records were closed. So if the law-makers DON’T give access to those records than adoptees MUST obey that and NOT go off on individuals that DO adopt or ADVOCATE FOR adoption.

…Here, NOW, is the post and comments…

Stalking Irish Madness, Through Adoption’s Lens

July 1, 2009 by Triona Guidry 4 Comments

I mentioned a while back that I wanted to read Patrick Tracey’s book Stalking Irish Madness: Searching For the Roots Of My Family’s Schizophrenia. I had the opportunity recently to do so and it’s an intense journey through one family’s experience.

Being an adoptee, I can’t help but read it through the lens of adoption. Knowing that my birth mother is Irish by descent, and knowing that there is some hitherto unidentified mental illness that runs on that side, naturally my curiosity about this book was piqued. I’d like to highlight some of the things that spoke to me and how it relates to my experience as an adoptee.

The notion that madness had favored the Irish had been kicking around since the 1850s… Genetically speaking, the Irish are no more at risk than any other people. But in their darkest hour their rates of insanity were pushed to extremes… [T]he Irish population in America had been largely Protestant and comparatively well screwed on. These newer arrivals, these Irish Catholics, were another thing altogether… Anyone could point the finger of blame–at the long history of famines and the malnutrition they spread, at drink, at religion, at emigration, at British inhumanity.

As a class, we adoptees are similarly tainted. Not too long ago it was thought that unwed mothers were of unsound minds, and that this supposed deficiency was transferred to us, their bastard offspring. Remnants of this mindset remain today in the knowing looks and snide comments we receive when folks find out we are adopted. People don’t say “bad blood” anymore, but they still think it, and our super-secret-sealed adoption records only confirm it. Reading this book makes me wonder more about my blood relatives, not just the immediate relations but those stretching back into antiquity.

I know that for most people, the idea of going insane is unthinkable. For most families sanity is a given, as easy as breathing, as sure as seeing the sun rise in the eastern sky. For too many of us, however, there is a creaky gate that swings open at the cusp of adulthood, and on the other side is madness. On us sanity rests no more securely than a hat blown off in the wind.

For most families, biological ties are a given. Origins are a given. The fact that you have Aunt Mary’s nose and Uncle Jed’s propensity for stupid jokes are a given. Most people learn this with ease, over time, through all the little remarks families make in their daily lives. Not so for adoptees, however. Conversations of this nature cease when we walk in the room or, worse, continue while deliberately excluding us.

That mental illness that runs through my birth mother’s family affected many of her relatives and siblings, one of my birth uncles “severely”. I don’t know what that illness is, its impact, how it might be treated. Reading this book makes me wonder anew: is it schizophrenia? Depression? Manic disorder? Something I haven’t heard of but ought to know about for the sake of my children? It’s an anvil hanging over my head, waiting to fall. I have been led to believe my birth mother is Catholic. Did the Irish Catholics Tracey mentions lend some irregularities that even now are floating around in my bloodstream like nanites, waiting to take control? Until my records are unsealed, uneasy thoughts are my only heritage.

Tracey continues:

[T]he diocese itself was no place to go for comfort. From the Victorian era until recent times, it ran a Dickensian regime. If there were not enough landed men to marry, a girl was sent to live behind the walls of a nunnery. If she first found herself pregnant, she was a slattern, her child a bastard. If the child survived the pregnancy, the Church wouldn’t baptize him, damning him, effectively, in a false God’s name. If he died, the Church wouldn’t bury him. As a rule, a child born out of wedlock could not be registered with the parish. Illegitimate stillborn babies were laid to rest in fairy mounds across the county line. Today, recuperation ceremonies are held in border villages to reclaim the remains, and a new sense of tolerance prevails.

I would venture to say it’s not tolerance that prevails, but the sense that “this could never happen today.” Except it does. One Irish woman Tracey meets says:

“[L]oads of people have turned away a Yank because they think they’re coming for the money. Back in my mother’s day, illegitimate children given up for adoption had to go to England. Now there’s a new law they can come back to claim the farm.”

Same in this country. When adoptees reach out to birth relatives, one of the first assumptions outsiders make is that we’re after some sort of inheritance. The only inheritance most of us want is the one rightfully due us: our heritage. There’s no money in the world that could ever replace that. Although, I do like the idea of those poor stillborn bastards being buried in fairy mounds. Perhaps they now live in that other world, dancing and singing at neverending feasts, having become fairies themselves. The thought brings me a measure of comfort.

In the same chapter Tracey writes something that will doubtless hit home to any adoptee or birth relative who has ever tried to search:

This is why I am not enamored of genealogy… What irks is that at some stage… a gap appears in your factual understanding of who your ancestors were. I realized this going in. I knew that even in this computerized world of name searches, the most mundane details of lives lived 160 years ago can be as hard to unravel as the tangle in my grandmother’s knitting bag. Sooner or later if your people were peasant Irish, the trail goes cold, the search thwarted at a sudden turn.

Or, if you’re adopted, the trail stops cold at the first crossroads: your parents. Funny how people can understand this if someone like Tracey writes about it, someone who is “legitimately” pursuing his genealogy. But if an adoptee or birth mother searches, roust the villagers and grab the pitchforks! Why the dichotomy? Why must we be forced to live in the dark?

I’d highly recommend this book to anyone, but for adoptees it may be of special interest. It illustrates how genetic ties, no matter how far removed, impact those of us living in the here and now. Disturbing, yet provocative. I wish I could travel to Ireland and see the places my ancestors once lived. What could possibly be the harm to my birth family in that? Why am I not permitted such a journey simply because I am adopted?

Comments

maryanne says: July 1, 2009

Another very interesting Irish piece. I still have to get that book. The famine is one of those awful “gifts that keeps on giving”.I have heard that the high prevalence of diabetes among the Irish is part of that legacy. It has to do with who was genetically more likely to survive famine and storing fat. Not surprising the high level of mental illness may be a legacy of the famine as well.

Nice comparison of Irish and adoptee issues, and I too was touched by the bastard babies buried in the fairie mounds. Have you heard of the recent study and report of abuse of all sorts in Catholic orphanages, schools, and other institutions? Devastating cruelty many years, constantly denied and covered up by Church authorities. It is called the Ryan report. Very nasty stuff, but we knew it from the Magdalen Laundries. It went much further than that.

AdoptAuthor says: July 1, 2009

Th need for medical history is of course not just an Irish issue…nor is suicide, depression or other mental health issues.

Depression suicide and eating disorders are part of my Jewish family tree and were passed onto to my daughter Alicia who I lost to adoption. From her father she inherited alcoholism. Together her genetics – and a change in placement unbeknownst to me when she was a year old – combined to cause her to take her own life at just 27 years of age. A tragedy that might have been prevented in so many way.

I tried to open her adoption when she was a teen. I offered medical history. Her aps preferred fantasy, denial and pretense. They never even asked me why her biological father had died at just 39 years of age! Wouldn’t you be curious?!?

triona says: July 2, 2009

maryanne–Tracey talks quite a bit about the legacy of the famine and its effects on subsequent generations. Much food for thought. I did a blog last month about the Catholic report (“There But For The Grace Of…”). It’s disgusting to think how many innocent people have been harmed by all this.

AdoptAuthor–By all means, the need for medical history is hardly an Irish-specific thing. I just see it through that prism because it happens to be my experience. Why must people insist upon secrecy when so many have been harmed by it? Adoption secrecy creates too much sadness for too many people, and far too many casualties.

Joan M Wheeler says: December 22, 2009 at 11:52 AM

Late to the game of responding to this post, but, I, too, was fascinated by this author on NPR in July. As I listened to his description of schizophrenia, I couldn’t help but wonder of another type of genetic influence called eppingenome. I could be wrong on the spelling, but it is the environmental effects on the genes that cause subtle changes for the next generation. Therefore, subsequent generations as well.

This speaks to the issues of famine, alcoholism, stress of pregnacy on an already stressed female — and that stress could be lack of proper nutrician due to famine, and, the intensity of stress and worry under harsh conditions of poverty.

When considering the added stress of carrying a pregnancy to term of an unmarried,societal “scandleous” pregnancy and all the emotions forced upon a woman at that time leading to the birth of a “bastard”, then the effects of stress (eppigenome) on the mother and particularly the baby are magnified.

Makes me wonder what is truly genetic and what is environmental. Adoptees are the world’s experimental rats.

End…

It’s a mind-boggling how Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel rants and raves, year after year…

ALWAYS KNOW THAT SHE LIES

duped by adoption & an woman's Struggle for Identity, a book study

View original post

‘I understand people’s need for privacy.’ Says Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel.

Source: ‘I understand people’s need for privacy.’ Says Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel.

Perhaps more adoption agencies should do this…

Source: Perhaps more adoption agencies should do this…

letter exchange with Joan M Wheeler…now Doris M Sippel

Source: letter exchange with Joan M Wheeler…now Doris M Sippel

2 of 2; Op-ed article, by Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel, gets insider attention from Gert McQueen! Part two of two.

duped by adoption & an woman's Struggle for Identity, a book study

There’s always another side of any story!

see part one here…https://gertmcqueen2.wordpress.com/2017/07/23/1-of-2-op-ed-article-by-joan-m-wheelerdoris-m-sippel-gets-insider-attention-from-gert-mcqueen-part-one-of-two/

Behind the scenes comments of Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel

Here, in this part two post, you will find a series of PUBLIC comments from, two different PUBLIC Facebook accounts, where Joan/Doris shared a link about her Buffalo News article. She then asked her friends to comment, on the News article and to ‘educate the public’, for the News EDITED her piece and omitted keys points! She then had continued discussions, in a public forum, about the on-going (real time) placement of comments, on the News article, as well as telling falsehoods about me and family. So much for MY AND MY FAMILY’S PRIVACY! This is WHY I objected to and wrote my comments on the News article, in the first place, for Joan/Doris uses her position to exploit my family via her untruthful book!

I will be…

View original post 3,200 more words

1 of 2; Op-ed article, by Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel, gets insider attention from Gert McQueen! Part one of two

duped by adoption & an woman's Struggle for Identity, a book study

There’s always another side of any story!

DISCLAIMER…Whenever one writes a public article, on any Internet site, and/or comments on a public article, or writes a comment on a PUBLIC Facebook account that is plainly labeled as a PUBLIC post, there is NO EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY. That being said, the commentators on this, on-line Buffalo News story, have given their ‘right’ to privacy away and publishing their names here, on a public blog, is PART and PARCEL of the News story.

http://buffalonews.com/2017/07/14/another-voice-cuomo-must-veto-flawed-adoptee-bill/

“Man did not weave the web of life, he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.”

― Native American Proverb

People who live in glass houses should not throw stones, particularly Joan/Doris! Her past deeds and words will ALWAYS follow her, regardless whether or not any of her friends care to acknowledge that, MANY OTHERS read the same news…

View original post 4,052 more words

A new review, on the oldest edition, of Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel’s untruthful account of my family!

Source: A new review, on the oldest edition, of Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel’s untruthful account of my family!

Joan M Wheeler/Doris M Sippel CONTINUES presenting her adoption status as something it is NOT and whiny about it!

She is NOT a ‘late discovery adoptee’ no matter how many times she attempts to say that she is! I have written about this before, here is just ONE, as a forum topic, for her lying book, on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/author-NOT-Late-Discovery-Adoptee/forum/Fx16ZHWP5PQHHCK/Tx6VSWXV1GAX18/1/ref=cm_cd_fp_ef_tft_tp?_encoding=UTF8&asin=B00X520CGW

Joan/Doris obviously needs ATTENTION and a PLACE to air her thoughts, as they COME TO HER, when she’s in a depressed state of mind. When she’s depressed she searches around finding posts that she can relate to and then re-TELLS her sad, sad false story. In this case, she has commented and reblogged an old blog onto her own blog as if it were CURRENT! She must be running out of pro-adoption sites to browbeat and insult others!

Here we find that she is commenting, in July 2017, on a post from April 2015! Joan/Doris comments as ‘legitimatebastard’. My thoughts will appear afterwards.

https://ellecuardaigh.com/2015/04/01/youre-adopted-the-ultimate-april-fools/

legitimatebastard says:  July 4, 2017 at 7:00 pm

Reblogged this on FORBIDDEN FAMILY and commented:

Even though this was written for April Fools Day 2015, this is still an excellent blog from Elle Cuardaigh.

Back in 1974, when I answered a phone call from a woman I did not know, I was a high school senior. I was 18 years old. This woman said she was my sister.

I knew I was adopted, but I was never allowed to speak of my feelings or my questions. I buried it all deep inside. So when this woman said she was my sister, I knew immediately that she really was my sister.

And at the same time, I knew that all I had lived for those 18 years of my life, was not real. I felt like a fool. How many people knew? Why was I the last to know? I wasn’t the person I thought I was.

Imagine being a high school student with final exams and the prom and picking out a college and making life-altering decisions, well, I went through the motions of all of that, but I was in deep, psychological trauma.

My parents KNEW and chose not to tell me! How could I trust them again? And then there were the rest of my relatives who all knew…

So, for me, I am not the total unsuspecting person who finds out late in life that she or he is adopted. I knew that I was adopted. I knew there were unknowns about me that were somehow going to be revealed. But that did not soften the blow as to how I felt that day in 1974, and for years later, and even now.

The shock of finding out the truth, and not from the adoptive parents who ought to have had the guts and maturity to tell me themselves, is something that I never recovered from, Betrayal, lies, fear, mistrust, radical acceptance… yes, this is being A Late Discovery Adoptee.

End of her comment…

        Gert here again…

As I’m the sister who phone Joan/Doris I have every right to speak about this and anything else that this individual has to say about myself and my family.

Joan/Doris never tells the FULL STORY, even though she has been told it over and over and over again, by family! I was ‘elected’ by my three siblings to make the phone call, because I was the eldest. It was the decision of FOUR of us, not just me.

We all agreed NOT to tell our father. We all agreed to discuss the ‘contact’ with a lawyer and an adoption agency BEFORE we made that contact. Both lawyer and agency said that as siblings we were in our LEGAL right to make the contact with the adoptee AND we did NOT have to tell our parent. Again, it was the decision of FOUR siblings and we stand by our right to make that decision. We also learned, later, that it was the WORST MISTAKE of our lives; making contact with that adopted out sibling. She destroyed each and every relationship she had with EACH AND EVERY birth family member! But that’s another story.

Eighteen is the legal age of being an female adult; that’s the law, I didn’t make that up! Some are able to be an adult, at 18, others are not; not my problem. I was 18 when I finished high school and TOOK the responsibilities of my ACTIONS; I got married and had a baby! If Joan was UNABLE, to handle being contacted by her birth family, when she was 18, that is NOT the birth family’s problem. Joan was THINKING about searching, so she was READY for being contacted, crying and screaming ‘I was young’ later doesn’t cut it. Joan/Doris is just a whiny cry baby that never has grown up!

She states in this post that ‘I knew I was adopted’ that in its self means that she is NOT a late discovery adoptee! The MEANING of late discovery MEANS that the adoptee NEVER KNEW they were adopted during their CHILDHOOD. Joan/Doris KNEW she was adopted.

She continues to state…

‘So, for me, I am not the total unsuspecting person who finds out late in life that she or he is adopted. I knew that I was adopted.’

And YET SHE INSISTS THAT SHE IS (a late discovery adoptee)! Is she brain-dead? Answer is of course! She suffers from cognitive dissonance (believing two contrary things at the same time).

She is writing and proclaiming that she is a late discovery adoptee NOW because she NEEDS ATTENTION, she can’t stand NOT having her say in the world of adoption! She’s never content to live the life she has!

But to continue on…she states…

‘The shock of finding out the truth, and not from the adoptive parents who ought to have had the guts and maturity to tell me themselves, is something that I never recovered from, Betrayal, lies, fear, mistrust, radical acceptance… yes, this is being A Late Discovery Adoptee.’

Poor Joan/Doris she is the ONLY person in the entire world that has been shocked, lied to, betrayed, had fear, knew mistrust, never been accepted and so much more! Doesn’t your heart go out to her? Give me a pail to throw up in!

One must wonder…what really do all those other adoptees out there think about Joan/Doris?

end